Beyond Fashion Summit in Berlin

Friday and Saturday I had two inspiring days in Berlin at the Beyond Fashion Summit. The summit was organized by BeyondBerlin, CIR – in cooperation with ESMOD – who did a great job in getting an interesting mixture of open-minded people together, which created a wonderful atmosphere. The probably largest companies present were:

Jack Wolfskin, who thoroughly presented their comprehensive CSR strategy, even though, like other companies they are still far away of implementing the Asian Floor Wages;

Kuiychi, who admitted that many things went wrong in the last time and that not answering to Stiftung Warentest was their coordination mistake; it seems that they take up things now and will look into the FWF;

Misericordia, whose founder Aurelyen did a charming presentation about the origins of his brand, the empowerment of his workers in Peru – and also about the beauty of Peru. Here is one of his pictures, you find more on their website (sorry for this unpaid advertising, but I liked the pics):

Finally, a lady from Stifung Warentest courageously tried to defend their strategy behind their latest CSR-test of jeans; however, her performance strengthened my impression that Stiftung Warentest does not fully understand the fact that implementing social standards is done in a developmental way and that their poor and intransparent methods of testing CSR misleads millions of German consumers in their purchasing decisions.

As some asked me for my presentation: Here it is, but I guess the slides do not really explain themselves. Well, I am working on producing a published text from my talk.


2 Comments on “Beyond Fashion Summit in Berlin”

  1. I just popped over ETI’s blogpost: “How to get fashion buyers to ‘think ethical'” http://www.ethicaltrade.org/news-and-events/blog/julia-hawkins/how-to-get-fashion-buyers-to-think-ethical
    Intersting addition.

  2. […] Unfortunately Mr. Hilpold seemed to have totally misunderstood me. He indirectly quotes me saying that a sustainable production would lead to a maximum increase in retail prices of 5%. This is, of course, total nonsense, which I have never uttered in my life. All I said was that calculations of the FLO/FWF and experience of Alta Gracia show that the retail price only increases by 1-20%, when living wages are introduced … You can also read this on my slides. […]


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